• The Library
  • a carpenter’s life

    Among all categories of architecture, the house is the most intimate. Where one lives, whether simple or elaborate, outdoors or in a high-tech connected home, we can like the chapters of a book, tell our story through the houses we inhabit. In A Carpenter’s Life as told by houses, author Larry Haun does just that. […]

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  • flow

    Yes, I’m late with this post but I’ve been busy baking and time gets all blurry when I’ve got my baking mojo working. Matter of fact, blurred time or what author Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (say that five times fast) calls “flow” is the subject of this book review. Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life is the follow […]

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  • yes, architecture does matter

    In Why Architecture Matters: Lessons from Chicago by Blair Kamin, the architecture critic for the Chicago Tribune, the author responds in a sense to an unasked question, that being, does architecture matter? As an architect, I’ve never really doubted if architecture mattered or not. My immediate reaction is “Of course it does!” However that response is […]

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  • on place and memory

    The habitué of the typical third place thus enjoys a richness of human contact that is denied the timid, the bigoted, the pretentious, and others who choose to insulate themselves from human variety. – Ray Oldenburg Ray Oldenburg’s The Great Good Place immediately reminded me of barbershop I grew up going to in New York. I loved that […]

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  • the Whyte city

    Cities for people who do not like cities are the worst of two worlds. – William H. Whyte William Whyte is without question one of my favorite writers about cities. I’ve watched his famous film, The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces, so many times. Recently, I began reading City: Rediscovering the Center and came […]